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policy and the environment and role of large-scale asset purchases. before doing so let me note the usual disclaimer. the thoughts i'm about to give you are my own. do not necessarily reflect the views of others on the fomc. there's a considerable diversity of views within the fomc and within -- commong economists more generally about the use of large-scale asset purchases and other unconventional policy tools. this is both inevitable and healthy given the unprecedented circumstances in which we find ourselves. let me be clear on where i stand. i support the committee's decision of last month, namely to initiate purchases of mortgaged backed securities at a rate of $40 billion a month. in tandem with the ongoing maturity extension program of treasury securities, and to plant a continue those purchases if the committee does not observe a substantial improvement in the waiver market outlook. given where we are, given what we know, i firmly believe that this was the right decision. in my comments today i'm only going to briefly review the case for taking that action as that ground has been w
squaur. if you look at the product environment space, more than 100 million. this is a new business which we started over the last three, four quarters. we are opposed to have a million dollars on our platforms. if you look at client relations, we have 32 new clients in q2 and many of them in the -- segment. so if you look at the indicators, all of them indicate that our specific execution of the direction has early resistance. at the same time, we've said that we are in a challenging economic environment. but we are investing for the future. increasing our revenue from europe and integration. that is not factored into the guidance because the deal is not closed. what does all this mean? early indicators indicate that our execution is yields business. we are confident over the long term. >> your dollar averages are flat. what's going on with your customers at the moment? are they taking a lot longer to make investment decisions and is that giving you less visibility about future guidance? >> there are two parts to the answer. if you look at this quarter, 98% of our revenue came from prepa
security incidents from last june to this july. these incidents paint a clear picture that the environment in libya was fragile at best and could degrade quickly. certainly not a environment where posts should be directed to normalized operations and reduced security resources in accordance with an artificial timetable. at today's noon hearing on the hill we'll hear from lieutenant colonel andrew wood, the green beret from the utah army national garth who was in charge of a security team in benghazi that left libya a few weeks before the attack. he told cbs as soon as he arrived in february there was pressure from the state department to shrink the security force. bill: it is unfolding as we speak here. peter, thank you. on that leading our coverage in washington. martha. martha: there is much more on this stunning development. did the white house cover up the attack in benghazi for political reasons? that is the question, really. that's what it boils down to. we will ask that to house oversight committee chairman, darrell issa. he will join us in a little while. he will lead the congressi
sleep. ideally, with your light sleep aspect, you want to have a dark environment. dark environment releases the hormone melatonin, which is your sleep hormone. >> that you put over your eyes. >> when it's light out, your body inhibits the release of melatonin. in a quiet environment, you want to make sure that off quiet environment because that interrupts your sleep cycles, too. >> maybe some ear plugs or white noise. >> ear plugs, or white noise. but when you sleep with the tv on, set the alarm so 20 minutes later it turns off. >> an alarm clock, you say? >> ideally you wake up without an alarm clock. if you need it, use it initially. you want good pillow so that you have the proper biomechanics. >> that's a great looking april low. pretty comfortable? >> tempurpedic. >> napping is okay, but don't throw off your sleep schedule. >> get a schedule, high qualltism it's not about doing more, it's about the highest quality sleep possible. >> and take some vacation time. sleep a lot. mark, thank you. nice to see you. >>> from slum to opera singer, a member of mitt romney's much maligned
need. what we need is for the federal government to establish and create an environment where the private sector can flourish. >> talking about earmarks is exactly the kind of craziness we do not need any more. earmarked -- $16 trillion debt. earmarked account for 1/2 of 1% of the federal budget. we are better off, but talking about that is like talking about a drop of water in the ocean. the government does not create jobs. the private sector creates jobs. if you one example, take a look at texas. the people in texas are close to the people in arizona. why and there -- is their economy doing so fantastic? they are consistently ranked as one of the top state friendly to business. what does that mean? they mean lower taxes, low regulation. and not worry about government trading infrastructure. all the government has to do is get out of the way and let the free market to its thing. >> you have been criticized for not bringing home the bacon, not doing enough to get federal money into arizona. how do you respond? >> most of the earmarks, in the transportation bill. that had 6300
, in a controlled environment where he's had a lot of time to practice, where he's had an opportunity to sort of think a lot about what he wants to say and frame his arguments and he went out and delivered. but now he's going to have to go out there and defend those arguments, going to have to go out on the stump and talk to people, talk to reporters. again, articulate the vision that john was talking about which he's been unable to do. we'll see if he's able to take that performance out of a controlled environment and i think the onus is on the president as well. he certainly came out swinging yesterday and did a lot of things people wished he had done at the debate on wednesday night, but he's going to have to make the same argument. >> well, the next two debates will be fascinating, as will the vp debate. for now, thank you both very much. >>> coming up, education was a key part of the debate the other night but can you save our schools? we meet the man who is trying to do that. bars. hmm? i just wanted you to eat more fiber. chewy, oatie, gooeyness... and fraudulence. i'm in deep, babe. y
a stock that can generate tremendous multi-year gains. right now we're in an environment where there aren't a lot of companies with genuine rapid growth. but ulta salon and tractor supply, they have it in spades. they have the long-term secular growth that makes money managers salivate. they're like dogs at the dog tracks before they get the mechanical rabbit. anyway. let's start with ulta. here is a company that has 489 stores in 45 states. and we know these stores are doing very well, or at least in the united states. how do we know this? in the latest quarter ulta posted 8.93% in same-store sales. ulta plans to open 100 new stores this year, increasing told footage by 22%. that's what these managers are looking for. you might think that kind of expansion can't be sustained for very long. you'd be wrong. ulta believes they can have a 45% increase in the current store cap. that's what these managers like. that means the company still has a very long runway for growth and it's why investors have been lapping up the stomach stock all year. i think the stock can climb higher. even though wi
. so i'm not going to revise history to pretend that. i grew up in a religious environment and i am proud of it. i was into the priest. i'm proud of that. i would probably enormously angry right now. so i am grateful for my faith and on and on apologetic about it. >> this is pretty remarkable we started talking a little bit about how it has changed over time. we could have also added to the 19th amendment and women becoming a part of this part of the democratic inclusion. [laughter] but most of the amendments have made it more perfect. they got rid of it. >> ausley understand. >> it is pretty extraordinary. the constitution frees up every american to be eligible for public office, and there is no religious test and that wasn't the prominent feature of the state constitutions. a lot of them actually had religious tests. >> you have the establishment in religion. so, on a understand that but i simply say that the country moved on. i grew up at a time people were respectful of religion and religious people. on grew up when the church was open all the time and nobody broke and and nobod
in the presidential environment, we're working hard to have those candidates run strong campaigns. there's only so much that a presidential campaign can do in terms of contacting households across the country. if you have a strong legislative candidate -- state, said that, whatever -- they're the ones who knock on the doors. -- state, senate, whatever -- they are the ones who knock on the doors. host: raising money for these candidates? guest: yes, we raise money, we give them services, we train them. you want to run the best possible campaign, so not only do they win, but they maximize turnout. host: what is the core mission like between gopac -- what is the coordination like between gopac and -- guest: we do not coordinate. host: just take a look here for our viewers, green is what you raised, red is what you spent over different cycles. if you look at 2012, the numbers look low compared to 2008. are you having trouble fund- raising because of super pac influence? how is campaign 2012 different than 2008? guest: now fund our organization with donations, as opposed to -- we are spending more this
corporate tax rate environment. >> well, you made that fairly easy. you ticked down that. but you can go into the details on this. as you know, a lot of those things could get accomplished given the two party duopoly in congress. but many of the issues that you're advocating are positions one or the other holds. so marriage equality, the obama/biden ticket is tfully supportive of that. balancing the budget now you say there is a big chunk of the republican party that advocates that. a lot of your views are being represented, though all just not in the same party. is that a fair statement? >> i think so but maybe not a fair statement from the standpoint that i think both parties give lip service to, for example, democrats give lip service to no military intervention when the reality is, continued military intervention. republicans give lip service to a balanced budget but, gentlemen gee, let's do it in 28 years and factor in growth to make that happen and both parties are debating on who is going to spend more money on medicare when medicare is a budget buster. we need to engage in mutual
environment. >> the capstone concept forward says the world is trending towards greater stability, yet it says the world is potentially more dangerous than ever. how will the stability overcome the threat? >> well, you know, when people ask me about afghanistan, the first thing i normally tell them is it's possible for violence and progress to coexist in places like afghanistan. i'd say the same thing about the paradox of stability and threat. they coexist. so i've talked about a security paradox which is violence is at an evolutionary low. and it is, except that the capabilities to impart violence are in the hands of people who heretofore wouldn't have had access to them. so you have a paradox of feeling as though the world is -- this is kind of the tom friedman the world is flat and connected and, therefore, is less likely to fight each other. maybe. but there's also the other school of thought that says it's in the unconnected parts of our globe where violence will be both more prevalent, but also more violent because the instruments of violence are more available now than they've ever been
that were posed yet, unfortunately were poseded a in a political environment. the timing of the hearing i think we can say was politically driven and there are investigations going on and even though we were opposiposses pos appropriate questions, there are still things we don't know. encalling the attack terrorism, did the group act on its own or with encouragement from the al qaeda which puts a different color around that group's agenda. these are things we still need to find out. clearly the state department has had trouble constructing and sustaining a narrative. it was only on the eve of the hearing that we had the definitive statement that there was no protest that led to -- that preceded the attack. if this was understood days or weeks ago, that probably should have been the initial account which i think can be accounted for through a fog of war, that needed to be corrected sooner rather than just on the cusp of a congressional hearing. >> p.j. crowley, great to have you you on the program. thank you. >>> and an important story that we have been following here, this 14-year-old gir
operations are safe and clean for our communities and the environment. we're america's natural gas. >>> all right, political topics are huge right now on internet search engines, but it is not often that the search engines themselves become the political story. cnn's athena jones shows us what happens when you search for the wrong word on google. >> reporter: google, yahoo! bing, search engines are a part of modern life. the top searches on google for the vice presidential debate were joe biden, malarkey, and who is winning the debate, but search engines can also raise eyebrows, for instance, when i type completely wrong into the google image's search, i get a lot of photos of mitt romney. >> reporter: google says that it was unintentional, they picked up romney's only description of his 47% remarks. we saw a similar situation on bing. >> for a search engine, they really rely on what is around the image to learn what it is about. if you put words, completely wrong, they think i guess it is relevant for completely wrong. >> reporter: sometimes it is intentional, these are called google-bombs
's an understatement. but you go up and in environment, at least i was fortunately enough to where we believe that it was perfectible. you know, it's very, i think, pretty much acceptable or maybe somewhat today to be critical or almost invariably critical of the country and pointing out what is wrong. there are obviously things wrong. there were obviously things wrong when i grew up in georgia, and that was pointed out. but it was always this unrelying -- underlying bailiff belief we were entitled -- it was the way we grew up. the nones who were immigrants who would explain it to us we were entitled as citizens of the country to be full participates. there was never any doubt that we were inherently equal. it said so in the decoration of independents. there were times later on -- make remarks reciting the not so pleasant remarks and reciting the pledge of allee again or say things i think were -- not be cell phones. [laughter] people can youtube and you it's around forever. i was upset about thing. but i grew up in an environment with people around me who believed that this country could be
a meritorious environment, right? we're already past a place where race is like the thumb on the scale, right? >> i guess i would put it differently. i would say it's not a rigid quota. it can operate as a plus factor, but to some people would be viewed as a thumb on the scale. the brief that was sort of moving to me in looking at the case going -- o the fisher going up to the supreme court, oral arguments are on wednesday, is a brief written by deans of harvard and yale. notice that harvard and yale are where anine of the justices graduated. when we do admissions, we do a holistic merit-based analysis. if we build a diverse class, racial diversity is one component of that excellence. don't take our word for it. go to mckenzie and mckenzie has done amazing consulting work with fortune 500. again, we can have queasiness about whether or not that's a metric, whether it's a social justice issue, engaging in mediation rather than this is good for the bottom line. going back to the 2003 case, the briefs moving to sandra day o'connor, it was now being swapped out by alito which is why many are worr
up and i think it just really does create the environment that we are actually working in as a government today that we still of continued challenges and continue to go to congress for the policies around in the health care profession, education programs and other basis of that. so the government of a little bit different and we recognize that because we have sovereignty had reservations. but we as people are also a little bit different, too and that is because i think they are so tied to our cultural customs and traditions, our language that are clearly based upon how we are as a people. you call yourself a language warrior and spend the whole chapter on language which we know how important this is but why today as a modern-day indian do we care about language? >> guest: great question. to me this is one of my primary passions, but to me language and culture are the important areas to focus on as the native people. it's a big part of what defines us. and of course, you know, a lot of native people didn't grow up speaking their tribal languages through no fault of their
considerable support to the department of state security posture in this uncertain and volatile environment. the sst's mission was to support and answer to the chief of mission in libya. i worked directly for the regional security officer. we provided security support, medical support, communications support, for every facet of security that covered the embassy. as the sst commander i had a seat on the country team. i was closely involved with the operational planning and support to the rsoes, security objectives. the embassy staff lived and worked together at two locations in, in tripoli and embassy property in benghazi. the sst supported security movements for diplomatic officers in and around trip lowellpy and other parts of libya as their work required. on two occasions i sent sst members to benghazi to support and bolster security at that location. the ss. it was closely integrated with regular diplomatic security agents working directly for the rso as well as mobile security deployment teams. i traveled to benghazi on two occasions with the rso. ones with the rso to evaluate the secur
for an individual woman is being able to create the kind of environment where she is content. that she believes she's dedicating the time she needs if she has children to those children and to her career. but i do think there is -- there is an importance in having larger numbers at the top because, let's be honest. women leaders are often different. to have a mix of both male and female at the top of a corporation i think is a really important mix. >> mitt romney has said that he plans to propose eliminating funding for pbs. >> i'm going to stop the subsidy to pbs. i'm going to stop other things. i like pbs. i like big bird. >> the national endowment of the arts, should he be elected president of the united states. of course pbs is where sesame street airs for people who watch it domestically. what do you think of the proposal? >> sesame street is a nonprofit organization and also a nonpartisan organization. i don't want to be critical of any camp. the perception that gives is a little bit misleading. because while we we have been on pbs for some 43 years, and we're partners and support i have of i
's challenging environment. unless you have the right perspective. bny mellon wealth management has the vision and experience to look beyond the obvious. we'll uncover opportunities, find hidden risk, and make success a reality. bny mellon wealth management you'd think i want to stay away from it at night. truth is, i like to stay connected with friends. but all that screen time can really dry me out. so i use visine. aah. it revives me, so i can get poked, winked, and -- ooh -- party all night long. only visine has hydroblend -- a unique blend of three moisturizers that soothe, restore, and protect to keep me comfortable for up to 10 hours. pirate party, here i co-- uh, honey? visine with hydroblend. find it in these visine products. everyone in the nicu, all the nurses wanted to watch him when he was there 118 days. everything that you thought was important to you changes in light of having a child that needs you every moment. i wouldn't trade him for the world. who matters most to you says the most about you. massmutual is owned by our policyholders so they matter most to us. if you're cari
life exists in extreme environments and the expedition itself reveals how people might live and work on mars if they were studying. that is of interest to the mission planners. so i followed the scientists in the field to understand how the export. it was a big topic at nasa exploration, but we had never even cognitive science in my home disciplined study exploration in the field as people really explore a new landscape. how did they decide where to go and what tools did they use? i documented how they collected and organized samples that they would analyze the instruments in their laboratories back on earth. i studied how the diagrammed and described their work in their notebooks and how this related to their published work. i observed especially how they tended to work alone or in small groups. but observing the scientists of pasadena, i was taken by the incredible contrast the scientists are indoors in a dark room part of a team doing everything by consensus. people from different disciplines are required to work together. geologists who in the arctic would race to the nearest out
and a regulatory environment where businesses can flourish. but it doesn't do much more. right now we have a federal government that is far too large, $16 trillion of debt, $1.3 trillion deficit. we need somebody who will stand up and fight. i have that record in the house. that's the record i will take to the senate. that's what i would appreciate your vote, and thank you. >> our next closing statement is from marc victor. >> ladies and gentlemen, our country was founded upon freedom. we are about individual rights and responsibilities. we are about free markets. we are about being free to both defined and pursue your own happiness. it's about americans being in charge of themselves. these are the principles that made us a great nation, but we have strayed so far from these principles. we have a busybody government that is into everything. it regulates, taxes everything and everyone literally to death. it's involved in our lives cradle-to-grave. over 16 trillion in debt now and going ever higher. highest incarceration rate in the world. over 2 million in prison. perpetual wars that we kee
, for hydrogen, for battery-powered cars, so that we can clean up our environment and at the same time get our economy going by creating millions of jobs. we can do that, we as americans, because we're the best innovators, we're the best producers, and 95% of the people who are our market live outside of the united states of america. >> senator obama? >> this is one of the biggest challenges of our times. and it is absolutely critical that we understand this is not just a challenge, it's an opportunity, because if we create a new energy economy, we can create five million new jobs, easily, here in the united states. it can be an engine that drives us into the future the same way the computer was the engine for economic growth over the last couple of decades. and we can do it, but we're going to have to make an investment. the same way the computer was originally invented by a bunch of government scientists who were trying to figure out, for defense purposes, how to communicate, we've got to understand that this is a national security issue as well. and that's why we've got to make some investm
operations are safe and clean for our communities and the environment. we're america's natural gas. >>> so what's the expression you should never work with kids or animals? well, take a look at what happens. this is a story involving our own kathie lee gifford. here's what happened in our fourth hour on thursday. >> puppy needs a bathy. >> oh, oh, oh. >> that's what we don't do. >> puppy took a nosedivy. >> i'm sorry, honey. i'm sorry. >> puppy's okay. >> the puppy's okay. kathie lee and hoda are on the phone right now. kathie lee, have you gotten over this? >> the puppy is okay, but i'm a wreck. >> yeah, i know. this was upsetting for you. >> this is upsetting for me. i have three dogs of my own and adore dogs and have realized what the problem was. the problem is that this dog did not want to go home with hoda. >> i'm on the phone. >> he wanted to go back. he knows hoda is looking to adopt a dog, and he -- he knows what her apartment is like, and there's no way. >> wow. >> get me away. >> hoda, looking at your reaction. you really under-react there had. >> look, i was terrified for that
Search Results 0 to 42 of about 43 (some duplicates have been removed)